Atramuntanat

Production details

  • Venue
  • Stockbridge House
  • Edinburgh Festival
  • Production company
  • Motiv Productions
  • Performance dates
  • 4–28 August 1999
  • Written & directed by
  • Ken Bentley
  • DSM
  • Samantha Schubert
  • Produced by
  • Ken Bentley
  • Andrew Dickens

Cast

  • Salvador Dalí
  • Marcus Hamer
  • Gala Eluard
  • Kirsty Yates
  • Luis Buñuel
  • Andrew Dickens
  • Paul Eluard
  • Daniel Gabriele

Synopsis

Fact: August 1929, Salvador Dalí is working on a screenplay with his good friend, the film-maker Luis Buñuel, at his home in Cadaqués on the north-east coast of Spain. They are joined by friends from Paris, Gala Eluard and her husband Paul Eluard, a poet and art dealer.

Fiction: What begins as a relaxing holiday with friends rapidly turns into a whirlwind of desire and exploitation. Atramuntanat tells the tragic story of a defining moment in the life of one of the 20th century’s most influential artists.

Ken Bentley’s first full length play as a writer.

A gripping tale of friendship and disloyalty, love and fidelity.
— The Scotsman (The Hot List)
In the inter-war years, Salvador Dali was synonymous with outrageous defiance of convention, and Ken Bentley has therefore written and directed a sensible play portraying him as an innocent, out of his depth in anything except surrealism, exhibitionism, blasphemy or the wilder shores of sex. He is ready to murder someone, if asked, but the thought of boy meeting girl leaves him a bit scared... A play to remember and an author and cast to watch.
— The Scotsman (★★★★)
A marvellous sex comedy or an insightful behind-the-scenes peek at the commercialisation of art, depending on how you look at it. The talented cast – Andrew Dickens, Daniel Gabriele, Marcus Hamer and Kirsty Yates – bounce off each other magically, something that must give great satisfaction to writer/director Ken Bentley, whose own magic provides a contemporary airing without losing any of the period feel. An absolute must see (but what a poor title).
— The Stage